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Katie Patrick on how to save the world

“If we really want to change the world, we need to slow down.”

Katie Patrick

Often on the podcast we dance around the topic of technology – usually viewing it as something that gets in the way of our efforts to slow down and live a more mindful, sustainable life. But what if we embraced technology and viewed it as the greatest opportunity we have to change (or maybe even save) the world?

In this week’s episode I chat with Katie Patrick, an environmental engineer and designer who applies data-driven, gamification, and behavior-change techniques to solve the world’s environmental problems.

And upon reading that you might think, “What does that have to do with slow living?” but let me share with you that it has everything to do with slow living.

In our conversation today, Katie shares how it’s only possible to access our full creative potential (the same creative potential that we need to access if we want to create world-changing solutions) if we learn to slow down. (Yes I said “Woah,” out loud when I first heard this.)

And in further narrative-shattering news, Katie tells me that our brain does not function in its optimal, problem-solving state if we spend all of our time stressed out and rushing. So in that sense, day-dreaming and doodling and working on creative projects with no specific outcome attached is not only good for our health, but it’s good for our brains and the planet itself.

There are a lot of people who listen to this podcast who want to change the world in both big and small ways. Maybe you want to reduce plastic waste or encourage people to compost. Maybe you’re spreading peace throughout your neighbourhood by teaching meditation or simply being that oddball aunt or uncle who teaches young kids random facts about flowers in the hope that one day they will grow a love of nature and a desire to protect it.

No matter how you want to change the world, this episode is full of strategies and suggestions on how to do it. Not only in your own efforts, but in inviting others to join your efforts too. Because I think that’s one of the biggest hurdles we face right now in making big, world-changing efforts: how do we get others onboard?

Katie brings with her a completely new perspective on what it’s going to take to change the world, and it’s a refreshing, hope-filled, imagination-fuelled joy to listen to. This episode has so much juicy goodness for us to think about and I can’t wait to see what world-shaking changes it brings about in all of us.

Questions featured in this episode: 

  • What role does optimism play in our ability to change the world?
  • Why do we need to slow down in order to access our creative potential?
  • If we lead busy, full lives, how can we make space and time for creativity, particularly when it feels like a ‘nice to have’ rather than a necessity?
  • What’s the link between optimism and taking action?
  • Why do you think the current environmental, climate crisis messaging is falling flat for so many people? What can we do to change it?

Head over to iTunes to subscribe to the show and play the episode.

Or you can listen to the show directly, simply by hitting the Play button above. Enjoy!

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Things to Check Out After Today’s Episode:

As always, thank you for listening!

Love Slow? Support the show!

Kali Gray on body positivity, mindful eating and living counter-culturally

“Life’s too short to worry about the size of your thighs or the calories in a latte.”

Kali Gray

Is there a link between the rise in consumerism, the endless advertising messages that assault us thousands of times a day and the increase in body image issues? According to today’s guest, the answer is a resounding yes.

I’m so excited to bring you today’s episode because it brings yet another perspective to this season’s conversations on what it is to live a slower life and the myriad ways we can apply the ideas of slow.

Today I chat with Kali Gray, a body confidence expert and a “non diet” dietician who focuses her work on helping people heal their relationship with their bodies and their food.

In this episode we discuss the the relationship between food security and body image issues, while also looking at the crossover between my work in slow living and Kali’s work in reframing our perspective on food, self-care, self-worth and the food we eat.

So much of what Kali teaches is centred on self-compassion and self-care, and how those things can help us to heal those relationships, which is where I think it most closely links with slow living. In order to learn self-compassion and self-care (particularly in a world that profits from our self-loathing) we first need to slow down and pay attention.

Pay attention to the stories we tell ourselves about our bodies and the role food has in our lives, pay attention to the way media messaging, advertising and social media are keeping us in a negative relationship with ourselves, and pay attention to how we feel when we start making changes to our thoughts, habits and actions.

Kali also turns the interview tables around on me towards the end of the episode, which sparks a conversation on how all of these changes take time, and no matter how well-versed we are in consumerism, health, wellness, body image and food, there’s always going to be part of us that requires a little extra love and empathy.

Questions featured in this episode:

  1. Why do you think so many of us have a broken relationship with food and our bodies?
  2. Capitalism and consumerism are both linked to our dissatisfaction with ourselves and our bodies. How do you encourage people to recognise that and make changes so that we get to decide what is good and right for us individually?
  3. It’s counter-cultural to teach and encourage people to love themselves and accept themselves as they are, particularly in the face of a society that teaches us to find fault in our bodies from a very young age. Is that something that comes naturally to you?
  4. We both encourage people to ask the question WHY? Why do we do what we do? Why do we buy what we buy? Why do we eat what we eat? Do you find that once we begin to uncover that why, it becomes simpler to start making changes?
  5. As a process, this asking why and digging deep is uncomfortable. How do you encourage people to accept that this is outside their comfort zone and move through regardless?
  6. You highlight mindful eating as a way to begin to heal our relationship with food, but what actually is it to eat more mindfully?
  7. How can we begin to eat more mindfully? What’s the first step?
  8. There is this beautiful undercurrent of awe in all you do, and that means you frame your work in the idea that every body, right now, as it is, is a miracle. What is the reaction from people when you ask them to pay attention to the miracle of their body? Particularly if they have grown up not knowing how to like their bodies?
  9. Young kids have no issues with accepting their bodies as they are, but as they get closer to puberty this changes, and suddenly they’re seeing all that’s wrong with them. Why do you think this happens?
  10. What can we do to help ourselves and our kids move through that?

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Head over to iTunes to subscribe to the show and play the episode.

Or you can listen to the show directly, simply by hitting the Play button above. Enjoy!

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Things to Check Out After Today’s Episode:

As always, thank you for listening!

Love Slow? Support the show!

Sheri Salata on embracing the beauty of No

“I’m dedicating myself to really inhabiting slow.”

Sheri Salata

One of the many, many highlights of hosting the poggie is that I have the opportunity to regularly talk with passionate, intentional, conscious, self-aware people. People who have decided to go deep in to their own lives and really do the head and heart work of figuring out what’s important to them, then digging deeper to work out how they’re going to create a life with more space for those important things.

I’m so thrilled to bring you this week’s episode, where I chat with the utterly delightful human that is Sheri Salata who has done just that – digging deep in to her own life and doing the work of reprioritising – despite working for one of the most high-profile and well-loved brands in the world in a high-pressure, high-stress (and maybe even high-ego) job.

I was lucky enough to catch up with Sheri in person when we were in LA on the book tour last year and am so excited we finally got the opportunity to chat on the poggie because while not all of us get the opportunity to work with Oprah, we do all get the opportunity to slow down and really consider what’s important to us as individuals. And we also get the opportunity to gradually start putting those things at the centre of our lives by letting go, saying no, making space and getting clear on our why.

Sheri was the executive producer of the final five seasons of Oprah and Co-President of OWN before she decided to walk away in 2016 and pursue a simpler, more values-aligned life and, hoo boy, friends, does she have some knowledge nugs to drop on us this week – specifically on how to embrace the beauty of “no” both given and received, and how we can choose to view those “no’s” as obstacles or invitations.

Sheri is someone I admire a lot, because she has this incredible ability to strip things down to their very core and chooses to make her life decisions based on what she finds there, regardless of if it makes her uncomfortable or not. In today’s episode we discuss why she decided to walk away from her job with Oprah, how she knew it was time to listen to her inner-voice and what that first day of unemployment felt like after a career of high pressure work.

We also look at the role ego plays in our constant stories of busy-ness, how to get comfortable with discomfort, whether it’s necessary to reach a crisis point before making positive changes, her approach to living a spiritual life (and what it’s like to have Deepak Chopra on speed dial!) as well as her philosophy on living a full and glorious life in to her fifties and beyond. Particularly in a world that likes to make women believe that once we hit fifty we become irrelevant.

I can’t wait to hear your thoughts on today’s episode and hope you enjoy Sheri’s story as much as I did.

Questions featured in this episode:

  1. You’ve changed your life significantly over the past few years – what was the catalyst for those changes?
  2. You talk about going through a process of ‘reckoning’. What did your reckoning look like?
  3. How do you balance finding joy in the present moment and working towards the next thing?
  4. Do you think we need to reach a crisis point in order to reevaluate our lives? Or is there a way of manufacturing that awakening without hitting rock bottom?
  5. How did you learn to make ‘no’ a part of your vocabulary?
  6. What can people do to start their own process of reevaluation, excavation and reinvention?

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Head over to iTunes to subscribe to the show and play the episode.

Or you can listen to the show directly, simply by hitting the Play button above. Enjoy!

——

Things to Check Out After Today’s Episode:

As always, thank you for listening!

Love Slow? Support the show!

Blaire Palmer on rethinking our modern conventions of Work

“The truth you hold onto most tightly is usually the one that’s giving you the most trouble. “

Blaire Palmer

Work.

For many of us it is nothing more exciting than a necessary part of life, used to pay the rent, buy groceries and clothes and petrol, and maybe fund a holiday every few years.

But does it have to be a drudgery? What if we’re looking for a way to make work a part of our lives that lights us up? In a world filled with corporations more concerned with the bottom line than the health, well being and individual strengths of employees, is it actually possible to find work that is fulfilling? (And do we need to be self-employed to find it?)

It’s something so many of us grapple with, which is why I’m so excited to have Blaire Palmer on the show today.

Blaire is an ex-BBC journalist turned business owner, who works to help people unpick the industrial-age conventions of work and find a fulfilling way forward that works for them.

In our chat, Blaire shares her own story and the shifts she’s made to the way she works, how we can redefine work and the way we do it, the power of bringing humanity to your job, and the reason she sold her house and spent 7 months travelling with her daughter.

Questions featured in this episode:

  1. You’ve spent the past few years unpicking the industrial age conventions of work: What are they?
  2. When did you start to question these conventions?
  3. How do we start to shift the system?
  4. How can we redefine what success looks like? 
  5. What was the catalyst to shift from working long hours to the way you work now?
  6. What was the call to return and put down roots after travelling?
  7. Did you ever find an approach to balance that worked for you while travelling, and that works for you now?

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Head over to iTunes to subscribe to the show and play the episode.

Or you can listen to the show directly, simply by hitting the Play button above. Enjoy!

——

Things to Check Out After Today’s Episode:

As always, thank you for listening!

Love Slow? Support the show!

Katrina Rodabaugh on why mending matters

Photo by Karen Pearson for Mending Matters

“No matter how fast-paced our world gets, there’s something about our bodies that want to know where our food came from, that want to understand how our clothes are made, we want to know how to fix our houses. On some primal level, even if we have all the people in place to help us with these things, there’s a connection and nurturing and nourishment that comes from understanding it.”

Katrina Rodabaugh

Hello, and welcome to season 3!

After a longer-than-expected hiatus between last season and this one, it’s a delight to be back in your earholes. We’re so thrilled with this season of the poggie and can’t wait to share it all with you.

And honestly, what a way to kick things off.

Last Christmas, while my parents were visiting us in Canada, my mum taught me how to knit. It’s something I’ve wanted to do for a long time (never quite enough to take action, mind you) but the past 18 months of travel and stripping back our belongings has had an unexpected effect. I now value handmade things far more than I used to.

Where I used to view all things through the lens of minimalism (i.e. Is this a necessity?) I now have a more well-rounded, gentler view of stuff. I certainly won’t be diving head-first in to conspicuous consumption again any time soon, but I also acknowledge that the things we own can have a positive impact on us if we choose to own them mindfully.

I find myself drawn to handmade jewellery where before I didn’t want to own any. I’ve been playing around with making some of my own accessories (scarves and headbands at this stage) but am really hopeful of developing my skills enough to make things like blankets and rugs, crocheted dishcloths and produce bags. There’s a true sense of sustainability that comes from knowing how to create things, and the first episode of Season 3 of the podcast dives deep in to the sustainability of slow fashion.

In this episode I chat with slow fashion expert and advocate, fibre artist, writer and crafter Katrina Rodabaugh, who is so passionate about opening the door wide for all to access slow fashion and who’s enthusiasm for mending has me trying my hand at mending my own beaten-up jeans.

We talk all things slow fashion: why Katrina got started, how her fashion-fast experiment became her lifestyle, the art of mending, creating systems and networks for thrifting and more.

We also talk social media and the importance of ‘showing the cracks’, the trade-offs of going slow, and how to start slowing down your wardrobe.

This conversation is a practical, uplifting, inspiring call to action and I hope you enjoy it as much as I did!

Questions featured in this episode:

  1. What did your fashion fast initially look like?
  2. What surprised or challenged you in that first year?
  3. Was the idea of convenience something you had to overcome?
  4. You also grow and forage dye plants on your property and the colours you create are incredible – is this something new for you?
  5. Do you think there was a stigma attached to mending clothes, and do you think it’s shifting
  6. Where can people get started with slow fashion?

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Head over to iTunes to subscribe to the show and play the episode.

Or you can listen to the show directly, simply by hitting the Play button above. Enjoy!

——

Things to Check Out After Today’s Episode:

As always, thank you for listening!

Love Slow? Support the show!