Category Archives: Time

Finding more time is about learning to say no, embracing the Joy of Missing Out and disconnecting to reconnect. Set up tech boundaries, get more sleep and unlock time and energy you didn’t know you were missing.

40 Ways to Slow Your Holidays

Catherine Zaidova
Cue the jazzy Christmas tunes – it’s our final episode of the year! Welcome to the very festive, very fun, very crowd-sourced holiday special, where we share your tips for staying slow in the silly season (and throw in some of our own). Thank you so much to everyone who got in touch – we loved reading through your responses, and hearing all the different ways you not only cope with, but truly enjoy what can be a stressful time of year.

We’ve got more than 40 tips from listeners on how to bring a little more slow to your pretty much every area of your holidays, including:

  • holiday traditions
  • gifts
  • finances
  • food
  • time with family and friends
  • decorations
  • environmental impact

There’s so much goodness in here, and definitely something for everyone to consider for both this year and next. Whether it’s sipping a candy cane martini every Friday night like Steve (shoutout to Steve! Ben wants to be you when he grows up!) or getting organised with gifts, I hope you’ll find a little knowledge nug that resonates with you.

But if you’re already feeling overwhelmed and don’t know where to begin, I’d encourage you to step back from all the plans, all the to-dos and all the pressing engagements, just for a few minutes, and ask yourself what your priorities are for the holidays. How do you want the holidays to feel? What do you want to look back and remember after the rush is over? That’s a pretty great place to start from because it re-centres your attention on the things that are most important to you (and chances are they’re not really things at all, but people and time and connection and sharing a meal with people you love.)

And that’s a wrap (pun intended!)

Thank you so much for your support throughout this weird and wild and wonderful year, it means so much and is why we do what we do every day. Ben and I wish you a safe and happy holiday season, and all the best for 2019. We’re looking forward to more slow times ahead and will be back in your ears with our annual Summer Series, kicking off on Jan 3.

See you on the flip side fam! xx

PS. If you want to learn more about our new year-long, five-minutes-a-day slow experiment, head over here and check out 365 Days of Slow.

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Head over to iTunes to subscribe to the show and play the episode.

Or you can listen to the show directly, simply by hitting the Play button above. Enjoy!

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Things to Check Out After Today’s Episode:

Keep Listening:

Support the Show:

Recently we hit the mind-blowing number of 5 million downloads of The Slow Home Podcast! This is all thanks to your lovely self and the community of people who listen to the show every week, send in your questions and offer your feedback. I’m so grateful you’re here and part of this, and for anyone who has supported the show in any way over the past year – thank you so much.

We’re launching some really fun perks for our Patreon supporters in February, so if you wanted to support the show financially and join in the fun, head over to Patreon and sign up. Just $1 per month makes a difference and helps us keep the podcastin’ lights on.

Most importantly, thanks for being here!

Jocelyn Glei on fast tech and slow work

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When it comes to the fast pace of modern life, one of the biggest culprits is undoubtedly tech. Research now suggests that, in America, phone owners spend as much as five hours per day on their mobiles (FIVE HOURS) with just over half of that spent on social media apps.

It’s little wonder then, that we don’t feel like we have enough time for things like creativity, relaxation, mindfulness, downtime, meditation or reading. In fact, by far the most common excuse I hear from people who want to slow down but can’t, is, “I don’t have time.”

Life is undoubtedly busy, and technology is here to stay, but in today’s episode of the poggie I chat with Jocelyn Glei about how we can harness slow living and use it to better navigate our hyper-connected, fast-paced world without having to opt out completely.

Jocelyn created and hosts Hurry Slowly, a podcast that explores the intersection of modern life, slow living, work and creativity, and many of her guests work in the extra-speedy realms of tech and entrepreneurialism, so their conversations often take place through the lens of work. Because of this, Jocelyn and her guests often discuss the question so many people are asking, “how can I work in my fast-paced industry but still live a slow life?” And what’s more, they offer advice and really accessible insights in to how to do so.

We talk about how best to manage email and stop it from becoming all-consuming, as well as the pleasure and power of introducing more analog into your life (pencil and paper forever!)

We dive deeply into the relationship between mindfulness and creativity, and the importance of creating space for both rest and boredom. Here’s a hint: that’s very closely related to our upcoming May experiment, but don’t tell anyone.

I also ask Jocelyn about the connections between technology, risk-taking and meaningful human connection, and the way tech use impacts the way we form memories. It’s a really juicy conversation, full of insight and interesting ideas, and I’ve found myself thinking really deeply on this conversation over the past few weeks.

I’d also definitely recommend you check out Jocelyn’s podcast, Hurry Slowly. She is a wonderful interviewer and asks deep questions of her guests. Do yourself a kindness and check it out!

Enjoy.

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Head over to iTunes to subscribe to the show and play the episode.

Or you can listen to the show directly, simply by hitting the Play button above. Enjoy!

——

Things to Check Out After Today’s Episode:

Keep Listening:

Support the Show:

Recently we hit the mind-blowing number of 4 million downloads of The Slow Home Podcast! This is all thanks to your lovely self and the community of people who listen to the show every week, send in your questions and offer your feedback. I’m so grateful you’re here and part of this, and for anyone who has supported the show in any way over the past year – thank you so much.

If you do love the show and would like to show your support by becoming a patron, head over here to make a small monthly donation (as little as $1 a month) and know that any amount makes a huge difference to us being able to cover costs.

Most importantly, thanks for being here!

Rachel Jonat on the Joy of Doing Nothing

Nanda Green

Three-time guest Rachel Jonat of The Minimalist Mom is back! This week brings some real-talk to the topics of slow living as a family, as we catch up on the changes in Rachel and her family’s life since she was last on the show, as well as talk about her new book, The Joy of Doing Nothing.

You might remember way back in Episode 30, Rachel and her family had just moved to Vancouver from the Isle of Man, and she and I talked about the ways city living and slow living tied in together. That conversation had a big impact on my understanding of slow, simple living, as previously I’d always imagined city living in opposition to slow. But Rachel shared the multitude of ways that city living actually made simple living easier (public transport, closer community, smaller living spaces, less home maintenance, easier access to farmer’s markets) and the reasons it worked for her family.

In Episode 93, the talk turned more specifically to kids and slow living, how Rachel managed to declutter and simplify with three young kids, and the expectations vs reality. For anyone who has a young family it’s a realistic, helpful, practical episode that I’d highly recommend.

In today’s episode we flip the script entirely though, as Rachel and her family have recently moved away from the city to a small town.

The decision to sell their condo in Vancouver and buy a house in a small town in the mountains of BC was a well-thought-out one that aligned with the needs of Rachel’s family, and also her and her husband’s values. She and I talk about the reality of making this decision, what led up to it, and how the change in location has impacted her family’s lives.

Rachel talks about the shift in pace from city to small-town living, which, given her new book, The Joy of Doing Nothing, is utterly relevant. She was working on the book right before she and her husband made the decision to leave Vancouver, and felt inspired by what she was writing about to try and find a life that gave her the time and space she wanted. The book is about slowing down and simplifying, but rather than being about stuff, it focuses on simple, actionable ways to create quiet time for yourself to really unplug and just be. It’s not an extreme approach in any sense, but it definitely taps into that fear so many of us have of not being entertained, distracted or scheduled, and encourages us to hit reset a little more often.

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Head over to iTunes to subscribe to the show and play the episode.

Or you can listen to the show directly, simply by hitting the Play button above. Enjoy!

——

Things to Check Out After Today’s Episode:

Keep Listening:

Support the Show:

Recently we hit the mind-blowing number of 3.5 million downloads of The Slow Home Podcast! This is all thanks to your lovely self and the community of people who listen to the show every week, send in your questions and offer your feedback. I’m so grateful you’re here and part of this, and for anyone who has supported the show in any way over the past year – thank you so much.

If you do love the show and would like to show your support by becoming a patron, head over here to make a small monthly donation (as little as $1 a month) and know that any amount makes a huge difference to us being able to cover costs.

Most importantly, thanks for being here!

Katy Bowman talks barefoot walking and couchless living – Summer Series

Photo by Jordan Whitt on Unsplash

Hello, and welcome to the Slow Home Summer series! For 5 weeks over December and January we’ll be revisiting some of our favourite episodes from 2017, so we can walk the walk and slow down during the Christmas break. Also it turns out podcasts, just like fine wine, really do get better with age. Whether you missed them the first time around, or are having another listen, we hope you enjoy these poggies as much as we did!

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I was first introduced to Katy Bowman’s work when I started to explore the idea of barefoot bushwalking earlier this year. Katy writes a lot about removing the casts of modern life (shoes are just one of them) and unlocking the benefits of movement, and for me, barefoot bushwalking was the perfect introduction to that idea.

The first time I walked Red Hands Cave track barefoot was a revelation to me. Not only did my feet feel incredible while I was walking, but it also really forced me to slow down and truly pay attention to where I was headed, what I was doing with my body and how it made me feel. Interestingly, I rode a wave of euphoria for days after too, as my feet had a looseness, a lightness and a vitality I didn’t know they could have. Now I keep my feet bare as much as possible. (A pair of thick wooly socks are my dearest friends in winter!)

In today’s poggie I speak with Katy, a biomechanist and movement advocate, about the curse of convenience in modern life and what it is costing us in terms of movement, the food we eat, our health, our relationships and the larger structure of our society in general.

We also talk about the infiltration of technology into the lives of both adults and kids, as well as some really practical ways of lessening the impact technology has on our days, and how to deal with the inevitable complaints from kids (and maybe some adults) when they’re forced outside. We also talk about the massive benefits of spending more time outdoors and why Katy is lobbying for outdoor exposure to be classified as a nutrient.

Katy shares her families journey towards minimalism and why it began with letting go of their couch, and how the root of their simplification lies in a desire for more movement rather than less stuff.

I was struck by so many things talking to Katy, but one of the biggest was her intention. There’s meaning and choice and reason behind each of her actions, and for me that’s one of the biggest connections between nutritious movement and slow living – paying attention, asking why and living accordingly.

I also came away from this chat determined to add more intentional movement to our days and will be serving breakfast outside as often as I can!

Enjoy!

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Head over to iTunes to subscribe to the show and play the episode.

Or you can listen to the show directly, simply by hitting the Play button above. Enjoy!

——

Things to Check Out After Today’s Episode:

Keep Listening:

Support the Show:

Recently we hit the mind-blowing number of 3.5 million downloads of The Slow Home Podcast! This is all thanks to your lovely self and the community of people who listen to the show every week, send in your questions and offer your feedback. I’m so grateful you’re here and part of this, and for anyone who has supported the show in any way over the past year – thank you so much.

If you do love the show and would like to show your support by becoming a patron, head over here to make a small monthly donation (as little as $1 a month) and know that any amount makes a huge difference to us being able to cover costs.

Most importantly, thanks for being here!

Goals and resolutions and to-do lists, oh my!

Photo by Estée Janssens on Unsplash

Ben loves goals, while I really, honestly don’t. The question is, will we be able to find a way around this and continue in life, love and podcasts? You’ll have to listen to find out!

Like florals to spring are goals and New Year’s resolutions to the end of the year. Today we talk about our recent discovery that Ben is way more goal oriented than I am. Like a lot more. The nature of Ben’s work is project-based, with distinct start and end dates – he’s used to end-points and moving on to the next thing, both professionally and personally. Whether it’s learning a new song on the guitar or painting the front fence, Ben feels like his life is like this, and I definitely feel like mine is not.

I’ll admit that my natural tendency is not to be goal-oriented at all. While I do need structure and to-do lists to tame my “panster” ways, goals actually make me feel claustrophobic. As soon as a goal is down on paper, no matter how SMART it is, I instantly want to rebel against it, a habit that’s potentially formed from years of feeling shame around not finishing things that I’ve started. I do make time for a semi-regularly sit down and big-picture brain dump or epic mind-map making session, but even those will be forgotten about and discovered a year later (often, interestingly, with many of the things having taken place, even without the piece of paper in sight!). Unsurprisingly, I’m also not a fan of New Year’s resolutions, but more about the actions and the doing.

However, both Ben and I agree that one of the downsides of not setting goals is not celebrating success enough. It’s a work in progress for us – actually stopping to take it in, reflect on what we’ve done and celebrate how far we’ve come, and what we’ve achieved. This also ties back to mindfulness for me, because I can see that being more present allows me to really pause and soak in the details of things.

The key takeaway for this week? It’s ok to not be a goal setter, but maybe try being a little more mindful of what it is you’re working towards. And maybe try experimenting with thinking of a couple of short, medium and long-term goals and writing them down in the Notes app in your phone (Ben’s location of choice). Think about something that extends you personally or professionally, or maybe make a mindmap or do a brain dump, and then look at the end game. What is it that you’re working towards? Once it’s time to turn that bullet point into a satisfying tick, take a moment (or a glass of something bubbly) to celebrate your success.

Are you a goal-setter? If so, tell us how you do it, we’d love to hear. Also if anyone really knows what SMART stands for, feel free to get in touch.

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Head over to iTunes to subscribe to the show and play the episode.


Or you can listen to the show directly, simply by hitting the Play button above. Enjoy!

——

Things to Check Out After Today’s Episode:

Keep Listening:

Support the Show:

You may have heard that we recently hit 3 million (!!) downloads of The Slow Home Podcast! Not only does that fact blow my mind, it’s also thanks to your lovely self and the community of people who listen to the show every week, send in your questions and offer your feedback. I’m so grateful you’re here and part of this, and for anyone who has supported the show in any way over the past year – thank you so much.

If you do love the show and would like to show your support by becoming a patron, head over here to make a small monthly donation (as little as $1 a month) and know that any amount makes a huge difference to us being able to cover costs.

Most importantly, thanks for being here!