Category Archives: Time

Finding more time is about learning to say no, embracing the Joy of Missing Out and disconnecting to reconnect. Set up tech boundaries, get more sleep and unlock time and energy you didn’t know you were missing.

Goals and resolutions and to-do lists, oh my!

Photo by Estée Janssens on Unsplash Ben loves goals, while I really, honestly don’t. The question is, will we be able to find a way around this and continue in life, love and podcasts? You’ll have to listen to find out! Like florals to spring are goals and New Year’s resolutions to the end of the year. Today we talk about our recent discovery that Ben is way more goal oriented than I am. Like a lot more. The nature of Ben’s work is project-based, with distinct start and end dates – he’s used to end-points and moving on to the next thing, both professionally and personally. Whether it’s learning a new song on the guitar or painting the front fence, Ben feels like his life is like this, and I definitely feel like mine is not. I’ll admit that my natural tendency is not to be goal-oriented at all. While I do need structure and to-do lists to tame my “panster” ways, goals actually make me feel claustrophobic. As soon as a goal is down on paper, no matter how SMART it is, I instantly want to rebel against it, a habit that’s potentially formed from years of feeling shame around not finishing things that I’ve started. I do make time for a semi-regularly sit down and big-picture brain dump or epic mind-map making session, but even those will be forgotten about and discovered a year later (often, interestingly, with many of the things having taken place, even without the piece of paper in sight!). Unsurprisingly, I’m also not a fan of New Year’s resolutions, but more about the actions and the doing. However, both Ben and I agree that one of the downsides of not setting goals is not celebrating success enough. It’s a work in progress for us – actually stopping to take it in, reflect on what we’ve done and celebrate how far we’ve come, and what we’ve achieved. This also ties back to mindfulness for me, because I can see that being more present allows me to really pause and soak in the details of things. The key takeaway for this week? It’s ok to not be a goal setter, but maybe try being a little more mindful of what it is you’re working towards. And maybe try experimenting with thinking of a couple of short, medium and long-term goals and writing them down in the Notes app in your phone (Ben’s location of choice). Think about something that extends you personally or professionally, or maybe make a mindmap or do a brain dump, and then look at the end game. What is it that you’re working towards? Once it’s time to turn that bullet point into a satisfying tick, take a moment (or a glass of something bubbly) to celebrate your success. Are you a goal-setter? If so, tell us how you do it, we’d love to hear. Also if anyone really knows what SMART stands for, feel free to get in touch.

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You may have heard that we recently hit 3 million (!!) downloads of The Slow Home Podcast! Not only does that fact blow my mind, it’s also thanks to your lovely self and the community of people who listen to the show every week, send in your questions and offer your feedback. I’m so grateful you’re here and part of this, and for anyone who has supported the show in any way over the past year – thank you so much. If you do love the show and would like to show your support by becoming a patron, head over here to make a small monthly donation (as little as $1 a month) and know that any amount makes a huge difference to us being able to cover costs. Most importantly, thanks for being here!  

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Slow Holidays: The Pre-Christmas Catch-Up

Nani Williams

Considering it’s only a few short weeks until the end of the year (wait, what?) we’re continuing our series on how to slow down the holidays so that we all may have a chance to actually enjoy them rather than simply grit our teeth and get through.

This week we’re talking less about the stuff that accompanies the holidays, and more about the busy-ness. There’s office Christmas parties and annual get-togethers with friends, holiday dinners and school concerts and end of year performances and plenty of other social engagements. And while most of these really are lovely things to do, when there are so many happening in such a short period of time it can be really overwhelming.

Ben and I talk about different ways of decreasing the busy-ness, and specifically, how we can take charge and be the ones who say:

  • Let’s catch up – in the New Year
  • Why don’t we all pack a lunch and meet down at the park?
  • Want to come on a bush walk with us?
  • We’re inviting all our loved ones to our place for one big holiday catch-up. Bring a plate.

But we also talk about the fact that this is a busy time of year, and there’s benefit to be had by accepting and embracing it (to a point). Enjoy the hell out of the concerts and the dinners and the act of spending time with loved ones. It might be busier than you’d like, but what a way to spend out time, hey?

I’d love to know how you try to keep a lid on the holiday busy-ness. Do you have a rule about how many events you attend? Or are you the one instigating them? Do you love the rush of a full calendar this time of year?

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Head over to iTunes to subscribe to the show and play the episode.

Or you can listen to the show directly, simply by hitting the Play button above. Enjoy!

——

Things to Check Out After Today’s Episode:

Keep Listening:

Support the Show:

You may have heard that we recently hit 3 million (!!) downloads of The Slow Home Podcast! Not only does that fact blow my mind, it’s also thanks to your lovely self and the community of people who listen to the show every week, send in your questions and offer your feedback. I’m so grateful you’re here and part of this, and for anyone who has supported the show in any way over the past year – thank you so much. If you do love the show and would like to show your support by becoming a patron, head over here to make a small monthly donation (as little as $1 a month) and know that any amount makes a huge difference to us being able to cover costs. Most importantly, thanks for being here!

Love Slow? Support the show!

Disconnect to reconnect

Aaron Burden

Technology is an inevitable part of even the slowest of modern lives. This podcast, news sites, social media, blogs, forums, videos… even if you’re being intentional it can (and will) be overwhelming at times.

This week Ben and I talk about what we stand to gain by disconnecting regularly and why it’s so important to reconnect with what matters, without the distracting blare of notifications and devices vying for our attention.

In SLOW I write:

Modern connection technology has delivered us a paradox. We have more connection and less humanity. We’re hyper-engaged and increasingly isolated. We have more information and less critical thought. We see more tragedy and have less empathy. We enjoy more privilege but are less satisfied. We are sensitive to personal offence and desensitised to the suffering of others.

The connected world offers us so much – so much to learn, to see, to share, to do. But hyperconnection brings with it a steep downside.

Slow living provides an opportunity to step back, pay attention and question the ways we use technology, to recalibrate our relationship with the constantly switched-on, logged-in world. It offers us an opportunity to disconnect, in order to reconnect.

The biggest question is how?

Firstly, it’s important to keep in mind what we stand to gain by having more in-person connection:

    • more time – connection technology steals minutes and hours a day, and we barely notice
    • more humanity – screens can create a sense of distance between us and others, and the internet can harden us
    • more action – when we waste time procrasti-scrolling we not only lose those minutes but we also lose the opportunity to do something with those minutes. Just because we’re doing something doesn’t mean we’re being productive
    • more peace and quiet – the stimulus and noise is incessant when we’re connected constantly
  • more ability to think and reflect – when we let the noise abate and learn to sit in the silence we give ourselves the ability to think more deeply, and it’s in these moments that some of our best ideas come forward

And then it’s a matter of establishing some boundaries and sticking to them, knowing what’s at stake if we don’t.

Some of the simple boundaries we have in our home include:

    • screen-free bedrooms
    • no screens at the table
    • pockets of screen-free time every day (the first and last hours of the day, for example)
  • we try to find places where there is no wifi and revel in the peace it brings

It’s an evolving set of boundaries that continue to expand as we find the joy in disconnection, and if ever I find myself slipping back in to those old patterns of overconsumption or hyperconnection all I have to do is look up and see what I stand to gain by switching off. How do you manage connection technology in your home? What boundaries or rules work for you? And what do you find challenging? Let us know in the comments.

Enjoy!

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Or you can listen to the show directly, simply by hitting the Play button above. Enjoy! ——

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JOMO – The Joy of Missing Out

JOMO - The Joy of Missing Out - Episode 180 of The Slow Home Podcast

Most of us have heard of (and experienced) FOMO at some point. FOMO is the Fear of Missing Out and it strikes at the heart of modern life. We do things, attend things or buy things in order to avoid it, but there will always be things we miss out on, so why do we struggle with it so much?

A couple of weeks ago a friend of ours (Mr Andy McLean – friend of the show – you may know him from such episodes as Episode 124 of The Slow Home Podcast) sent us a photo of the above Leunig poem. It’s about as relevant to us as anything possibly could be, so Ben and I thought this would be a great topic to chat about on today’s poggie.

JOMO is the Joy of Missing Out and the antidote to FOMO. It’s the utter delight that is saying no and doing less and choosing to not compete in the Busy Olympics. JOMO is a breath of fresh air when it feels like we’re choking on the idea that in order to be successful we need to be constantly in motion, striving and chasing the life that will make others envious.

JOMO comes from a place of abundance (everything, right now, is enough) while FOMO comes from a place of scarcity (I’m scared that this will never be enough) and I think there is a very real and deep life lesson hidden in these dorky acronyms.

Ben and I talk through the difference between fear and joy in today’s episode as well as the many ways we can apply it in life. JOMO doesn’t only apply to the highlights we see of other people’s days, as they appear on Instagram or Facebook. JOMO can also apply to our stuff, busy-ness, excess, social media, comparisons, keeping up with the Joneses… In all of those areas of life we can joyfully choose to see that we have enough, after which saying no becomes a relief.

We also like to end most of these episodes with a thought or an action, and this week we encourage you to embrace the idea of JOMO. Rather than worry about what you don’t have or what you’re missing out on by saying no, dive head-first into it!

Enjoy!

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Head over to iTunes to subscribe to the show and play the episode.

Or you can listen to the show directly, simply by hitting the Play button above. Enjoy!

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The Slow WIP (aka a Work In Progress podcast)

The Slow WIP - Episode 153 of The Slow Home Podcast

When is a hostful not actually a hostful? When it’s a WIP! (Otherwise known as a Work In Progress). 

A few weeks ago I wrote a post over on The Art of Simple, outlining mine and Ben’s weekly WIP. I was a little worried that it would be boring, but it turns out this is an idea that resonated with lots of readers so I thought it would be a good opportunity for Ben and I to look at another really practical thing we’ve implemented over the past year and a half of self-employment. Essentially it allows us to work together, be productive and actually like each other at the end of (almost) every day. 

We look at the structure of our WIP, why they work and how we use them to give shape and direction to the rest of our week, as well as how we each manage when unexpected things pop up.

Interestingly, this also leads us in to a wider conversation around the issue of living a less-than-slow life right now, and how we find balance between building a business and maintaining a certain level of slow-ness in our home home and family life. It’s not an easy one to strike and there are a few times in today’s poggie where I admit to the toll it takes when advocating for slow while not being able to live it. But on the flipside, I also talk about how I’ve turned that from a guilt-ridden experience to one of learning and gaining a deeper understanding of what the mindset of slow living looks like – even when it’s not slow-paced. 

Ben and I also talk about some of the changes we’re in the midst of making in our work and how we think it’s going to impact the podcast and the ways in which we can help you live a slower, simpler life yourself. 

There’s plenty of honesty in this poggie, that’s for sure! 

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Head over to iTunes to subscribe to the show and play the episode.

Or you can listen to the show directly, simply by hitting the Play button above. Enjoy!

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